Milk's good, learn why

Separate living quarters shortly after birth protect the health of the calf by ensuring the best individual care. Since newborn calves need time to build up their immune systems, it is better that they are not exposed to germs in the environment or germs that can be passed on from older animals. Another way farmers ensure the health of their calves is by feeding newborns two to four quarts of colostrum—the first milk the mother produces after giving birth. This special milk is usually delivered by bottle. Colostrum is high in fat and protein and contains antibodies that help build the calf’s immune system.

Why are calves put in separate pens after they are born?

In addition to carrying out their individual commitments to their cows, dairy farmers and the dairy community have created FARM (Farmers Assuring Responsible Management), a nationwide, verifiable animal well-being program that brings consistency and uniformity to on-farm animal care and production practices. The FARM program supports farmers with education on animal care and provides the public with added assurance of proper animal care.

How do we know dairy farmers are taking good care of the cows on their farms?

Yes. Dairy farmers are dedicated to producing high-quality milk, and that begins with taking good care of their cows. Dairy farmers work closely with veterinarians and professional nutritionists to keep their cows healthy and well-nourished. Nutritious diets, healthy living conditions, and good veterinary care are all essential when it comes to producing safe, wholesome, nutritious milk.

Do dairy farmers care about their animals?

No. Stringent government standards ensure that all milk is safe, wholesome and nutritious. Recent government testing found that all of the milk samples tested were free from pesticide residue.

Are there pesticides in milk?
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No. Hormones are naturally present in foods of plant and animal origin, including milk. Some farmers choose to supplement some of their cows with recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST) to increase milk production, but science shows that there is no effect on levels in the milk itself.

Are hormones added to milk?

Pasteurization kills harmful bacteria, such as E. coli O157:H7, Listeria and Salmonella, that can be found in raw milk (milk that has not been pasteurized). All milk intended for direct consumption should be pasteurized, as it's a matter of food safety.

Why is milk pasteurized?

There are strict guidelines from government agencies for all dairy farms, including sanitation, use of veterinary products, and environmental management. Organic dairy foods must additionally meet the requirements of USDA's National Organic Program.

What's different about organic farms?

Animals eat, therefore they produce manure. Manure has an odor. Dairy farmers work hard to minimize these odors by maintaining clean facilities, following proper manure storage practices, and properly applying manure as a natural fertilizer for cropland.

Why do dairy farms smell?

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meet the cows
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Holstein
The Milk Maid
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JERSEY
Ms. Personality
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Guernsey
The Golden Girl
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ayrshire
Big Red
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Holstein Dairy Cow
The Milk Maid
Holstein
Jersey Dairy Cow
Ms. Personality
Jersey
Guernsey Dairy Cow
The Golden Girl
Guernsey
Ayrshire Dairy Cow
Big Red
Ayrshire
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Holstein Dairy Cow
The Milk Maid
Holstein
Jersey Dairy Cow
Ms. Personality
Jersey
Guernsey Dairy Cow
The Golden Girl
Guernsey
Ayrshire Dairy Cow
Big Red
Ayrshire
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Featured farm

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Hillcrest Farms
Deering, Georgia

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Explore Georgia’s Dairy Farms

Hillcrest Farms in Dearing, GA is a fourth-generation dairy farm which features the highest production per cow in Georgia. The farm is owned and operated by Mark Rodgers and his brother, Andy, along with Mark’s daughter, Caitlin, and Andy’s son, Josh.

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